Dirt Rag Magazine

Review: Bontrager Old Man Winter boot


Cycling-specific, cold-weather boots have long seemed like a luxury item to me. That changed when I decided to get serious about fat biking and spend every weekend exploring snowy trails high in the cold Colorado mountains. Suddenly, no overshoe was warm enough and no casual snow boot stiff or snug enough. After spending a few weeks with Bontrager’s brand-new and rather svelte-looking Old Man Winter (OMW) boots, I am completely sold on the idea.

OMW Boot-2

If, like me, you have Raynaud’s syndrome (the cold-weather narrowing of the blood vessels in your extremities) or, even if you don’t, keeping your fingers and toes warm sometimes seems impossible. The OMW helps allay that with a fleece-lined, removable inner bootie packed with 200 grams of 3M Thinsulate insulation. The stretchy outer boot is made of waterproof, breathable OutDry material and features sealed zippers. The inner bootie has a drawstring-type closure. Paired with two outer Velcro straps, the boots allow for a very snug fit and offer plenty of adjustment.

OMW Boot-5

The liner is removable. I think the shoe would be much too roomy and not as comfortable to ride without, but I’m glad I can take it out and wash it. A rough material on the heel works as advertised to prevent the liner from slipping around inside the boot. The sole of the liner is not protected with any kind of grippy material, i.e. it’s not made to be removed and worn around your house as a slipper (which I would totally do).

OMW Boot-6

Because of my Raynaud’s, I have been wearing these boots in temperatures as warm as 40 degrees, which is actually too hot unless you’re casually cruising short distances. These boots really shine in temperatures down into the teens and twenties paired with wool socks, particularly if you’re exerting yourself. I can’t comment on their sub-zero performance as Colorado is experiencing a fairly warm start to winter, but my last ride started out in air just barely warmer than 10 degrees and involved a lot of near-crashes where my feet sank several inches into powder. The elastic pull tabs that tighten each boot’s ankle did their job, keeping snow out as I pushed a heavy bike up steep, un-groomed trails. After three hours of that madness, my feet were neither cold nor sweaty. Win.

OMW Boot-7

Sole stiffness is a 6 on Bontrager’s scale (the highest stiffness on any shoe the company offers is a 14). Walking around and driving are comfortable for short distances. I didn’t feel any bending nor did I feel the cleats poking through when mashing the pedals on steep, challenging trail climbs. While they might not be rigid enough for skinny-tire go-fast types, I am plenty happy with them on cold, wet road rides and they offer enough flex for all-day adventures that might involve espresso stops or setting up a campsite.

Traction is good on dry land but I—personally—wish for more aggressive cleats. The sole allows for two toe spikes (not included) which I recommend getting if you’re going to be pushing a bike up long, snowy climbs, especially smooth ones that don’t offer a place for your foot to grip the ground.

OMW Boot-3

The boots come with substantial cleat covers for the flat-pedal community and each boot has a gaiter hook just below the toe-box strap. Another nice touch are Velcro tabs on the rear ankles of the shoes that are designed as a place to put small red lights.

I had to order a full size larger than expected in order to accommodate anything other than a liner sock and to get the zipper to close around my ankle when wearing tights, but I’m grateful to have room in the nice, wide toe box for super-thick ski socks.

OMW Boot-4

A few minor complaints: It can be difficult to zip the ankle gaiter over the plastic pull tab on the laces and, if you don’t manage to raise the zipper completely to the top of the ankle, the pedaling motion will push it down. The ankle opening is rather narrow and, because of the zipper closure, not adjustable.

Actual weight is 1,205 grams (pair, size 43). If you don’t think in grams, just know that they surprised me with their lightness when I pulled them out of the box. They don’t feel clunky on my feet and almost look like regular shoes if you’re cruising around town and pull your pant legs over the ankles.

OMW Boot-1

If you’re planning to spend several months riding in sub-freezing temperatures—whether you’re commuting or mountain biking—consider these boots. I have enjoyed their warmth, comfort and adjustability, and no longer see a well-made shoe like this as just a luxury.

Price: $300. More details and purchase info from Bontrager.

 

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Field Tested: Shimano XM9 Shoes


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When Shimano announced the XM9 and XM7 earlier this year, I couldn’t have been more excited. These shoes looked to be perfect for cool-temperature fall, winter and spring riding. Now with a couple weeks of riding in these shoes, I’m stoked to report the XM9 is every bit as good as I had hoped.

This is the most rugged offering within Shimano’s “Tour” footwear lineup. The mid-height construction extends up over your ankles to provide coverage, support and protection. The Nubuck upper is made waterproof and breathable with Gore-Tex and a rubberized toe protects against impacts and scuffs. A plastic heel cup pairs with a mid-foot strap to ensure a secure fit as the laces are tightened up.

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The XM9 is constructed on Shimano’s Volume Performance Last, which offers ample volume and E-size width. A half-length shank provides stiffness at the pedal interface, but also allows the sole to flex for walking. On Shimano’s one-to-11 stiffness scale, the XM9’s sole registers a three. A Vibram outsole provides great walking traction.

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I’ve been riding the XM9 non-stop since receiving them for everything from mountain bike rides to commuting and I’m happy to report they’ve been nothing shy of awesome. For all-around use, the sole stiffness is a great balance of flexibility for walking and stiffness for all but the most aggressive riding. On the mountain bike, Shimano’s M647 pedals provided additional support thanks to their outer cage. This is my recommended pairing for aggressive mountain biking or any application where you want to maximize on-the-bike stability.

Folks in cold climates will need an insulated winter boot for the coldest months as the XM9 is not insulated. On the warm end of the temperature scale, I found these shoes to be comfortable up into the lower 70s.

Overall, the XM9 is my new go-to shoe for cool weather riding. They offer versatile performance and excellent comfort on and off the bike. Historically, Shimano shoes have held up very well for me over the long haul. Assuming the XM9 hold up similarly, they’re well worth the asking price of $250.

 

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