Dirt Rag Magazine

First Impression: SRAM XO1 group

By Eric McKeegan, photos by Adam Newman.

SRAM has been exemplary with trickling down technology from high-end groups to more affordable price points. Starting at $1,274 for the aftermarket kit, this isn’t the hoped-for X9 or X7 1×11 group many are hoping for, but it is a step in the right direction.

To be entirely honest, the XO1 group isn’t really that different from the XX1 group. The cassette is the same with a different finish. The carbon cranks are the same as the XX1 (and standard XO) with a differnet bolt-on spider, and the shifter appears to use many of the same parts as XX1, with aluminum replacing some of the carbon bits.

The cassette’s smaller 10 cogs are machined from a solid hunk of steel, and amazing feat when seen up close. The 42-tooth cog is aluminum. The finish is a mean-looking black, similar in appearance to the black stanchions on Rock Shox’s new forks. Yes this is a $400 cassette, but if you have a hard time understanding why that is, find one to examine off the bike, I still amazes me every time I see one.

The crank uses a 94 BCD four bolt spider, with chainrings from 30-38 teeth in even sizes. XX1 has a smaller BCD spider for chainrings down to 28 teeth. This smaller spider explains the minor weight savings for the crankset. Speaking of the crank, these carbon crank arms, orginially introduced on the XO group are one of the best things going. The bolt on spider means you can convert your current 2x crank to a 1x, or even use a one-piece aftermarket chainring. These cranks have been raced in DH, bashed around on demo bikes and generally used hard, I’ve never seen a broken set.

The shifter is obviously a sibling to the XX1 unit, and it appears to be lighter than XX1, according to the specs I’ve seen, I haven’t weighted either one personally. You can also go with a GripShift shifter, but I’ll ask you to keep that preference to yourself.

So far the 11-speed chains have proven to be strong and durable in our experience, and I expect the XO1 to perform the same way. I suspect the chains are under less stress since they are not getting pushed around from ring to ring up front.

The derailleur is also very, very similar to the XX1, with XO1 coming in at 30 grams heavier.

I got to ride the new group, but riding up the chair lift and blazing back down Whistler trails doesn’t do much to see how the system works under everyday use. I can say the chain retention is perfect, even on the blown out trails at Cranworx.

My thoughts on the new XO? With so few functional changes from XX1, I’ll go out on a limb and say this is going to be another awesome (and still expensive) drivetrain option from SRAM. As OE spec on a new bike, it might save just enough money over XX1 to score a nicer dropper, or upgrade to a carbon post. For aftermarket sales, unless you really need or want the 28-tooth ring (and aren’t willing to use an aftermarket option) XO1 might kill of most of the XX1 sales. There is no performance lost between the two groups, weight gain is minor, and the black XO1 cassette looks better too!

In other SRAM news, I rode the XO1 group on a new Lapierre Spicy stacked full of other new goodness from SRAM. The Pike felt amazing, and as long as the new Charger damper is reliable. This fork is the one to beat. We’ve got one on its way for long term test, and there might be a fight at HQ over who gets to ride it.

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