Dirt Rag Magazine

Irreverent Reverend: Bob Seals Interview Outtakes Part 2


dr178seals

In the current issue of Dirt Rag (#178, on sale now) you’ll find a ground-breaking interview with Reverend Bob Seals of CoolTool, Kleen Kanteen and Retrotec fame. This multi-faceted artist, activist, frame builder, race promoter and team owner, if not agitator, ran his whole operation out of his ranch just outside of Chico, California.

Seals was first interviewed in Dirt Rag #38 in July 1994 by Fernando Avallone and we strongly suggest you find and read that original interview, there’s too much there to miss. We also suggest you read the new interview by the same author in Issue #178 if you haven’t yet. Over the next few weeks we’ll be posting outtakes that didn’t (or couldn’t) make it to print. Most of these unimaginable stories are being told for the first time right here, in this second installment.

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Blast from the Past: Mongoose Minigoose Memories


Vintage product review shot from Dirt Rag #39.

Vintage product review shot from Dirt Rag #39.

One of the star attractions at Dirt Rag’s Dirt Fest is the fleet of Franken-bikes built by long-time Dirt Rag contributor Lee Klevens. One such contraption is a “mini-tall-bike” that the mad doctor built by welding a high-rise extension onto a 12-inch wheeled Mongoose Minigoose. This particular bike has an interesting backstory that begins 20 years ago.

Read about it here.

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Irreverent Reverend: Bob Seals Interview Outtakes Part 1


In the current issue of Dirt Rag (on sale now) you’ll find a ground-breaking interview with Reverend Bob Seals of CoolTool, Kleen Kanteen and Retrotec fame. This multi-faceted artist, activist, frame builder, race promoter and team owner, if not agitator, ran his whole operation out of his ranch just outside of Chico, California.

Seals was first interviewed in Dirt Rag #38 in July 1994 by Fernando Avallone and we strongly suggest you find and read that original interview, there’s too much there to miss. We also suggest you read the new interview by the same author in Issue #178 if you haven’t yet. Over the next few weeks we’ll be posting select outtakes that didn’t make it to print. Most of these unimaginable stories are being told for the first time right here.

Read them here.

Print

Blast From the Past: Reader Art in living color


KONICA MINOLTA DIGITAL CAMERA

Our previous “Blast” dipped into Dirt Rag’s black/white reader art archives and featured a selection of monochrome masterpieces. This edition is a horse of a different color. We’ve put together a slide show of reader art that’s subtitled: In Living Color. Thanks again to all of the talented readers who’ve sent us their artwork over the years. We appreciate your creations, and enjoy sharing them with the world.

See the gallery here.

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Blast from the Past: Reader Art


Since the very beginning, Dirt Rag has offered artistic types a welcoming space to showcase their creative talents. In addition to professional artists, whose works have graced magazine covers and illustrated feature stories, a number of regular readers have scored 15 minutes of fame via art appearing within the pages of Dirt Rag.

Danny Altizer, Issue #113

For a number of years, we regularly ran a half-page collage aptly named: Reader Art. While I’m sure folks were stoked to see their works in print, running five or six pieces on a half-page layout didn’t always do justice to the art.

The Dirt Rag blog to the rescue! I’ve decided to devote a series of “Blast From The Past” posts to showcasing some of my favorite Reader Art pieces. To honor Dirt Rag’s monochrome roots, I’m starting with some classic black-and-white artwork from days gone by.

See some of our favorites here.

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#tbt: Show us your tattoo


Shawn Brooks

With acres upon acres of cool bikes and gadgets on display at the annual Interbike trade show, it’s tough to get noticed. Exhibitors battle to attract the roving hordes to their booths. Most employ tried and true tactics: booze, booth babes and boatloads of booty (as in pirates’ booty, a.k.a. swag).

Dirt Rag has always been know for rolling its own. In 1996 our booth buzz scheme was a “Show Us Your Tattoo” promotion. We invited ink-bearing attendees to stop by our booth and have their body art documented via color Polaroid snapshots, which we posted on the back wall of our booth.

Dirt Rag Issue #55 featured a full-page black-and-white collage of our favorite 20 tattoos from the show. While rummaging through the Dirt Rag “hardocpy” archives, I stumbled upon the original tattoo Polaroids.

Eureka! This gold mine needed to be shared—in living color.

So without further ado, I give your “Our Favorite Tattoos” from Interbike 1996.

Click here to see the gallery.

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A brief history of the Dirt Rag Office Dogs


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Canine co-habitation has long been a part of the casual atmosphere that prevails at Dirt Rag headquarters. From rides to relaxation, they are a constant companion. Some are gone, some are still with us, but they all warm our heart – and our toes under our desk.

With the assistance of the respective poochies’ partners, I offer this tribute to the four-legged denizens of Dirt Rag, past and present.

Meet them here.

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25th Anniversary: 25 years of dirt to dish


moe-magazine

dr-anniversary-logo copyThis year is a major milestone for Dirt Rag. We’re celebrating 25 years of printing the magazine. The ‘Rag has gone from being hand-stapled in Maurice and Elaine Tierney’s basement for East Coast consumption in 1989 to where we are today in 2014: enjoying rapid circulation growth and distribution across the globe.

As part of the celebration our next issue will feature special content that’s sure to become a collector’s item. One feature story, written by Gary Boulanger, is an inside look at the history of Dirt Rag with an inside view of how it all began and how we got to where we are. As part of that, I’d like to share a few extra stories over the next few weeks that came out of Gary’s research. Hopefully you’ll enjoy them as much as I do and will look forward to reading this special feature when it arrives on newsstands April 1 or in your mailbox even sooner if you’re a subscriber (hint, hint).

Read about some of Dirt Rag’s not-so-illustrious moments here.

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Blast from the Past: The Original Dirt Fest


original-dirt-fest-1

The first edition of Dirt Rag’s Dirt Fest took place in 1991 at Camp Soles, a YMCA youth camp located in the Laurel Highlands, just east of Pittsburgh. For me, that era represents a magical time, marked by glorious tribal gatherings known as mountain bike festivals.

In fact, I’d learned about Dirt Fest from some friends that I met at the legendary Jim Thorpe Mountain Bike Weekend. I attended the first Dirt Fest as a “civilian.” A few months after the event, I became friends with the Dirt Rag crew by showing up at their weekly rides in Pittsburgh, and about a year later I landed my first job at the magazine.

Compared to Dirt Fest’s current incarnation, the original event was decidedly chill. There was no vendor expo bristling with the bleeding edge of bicycle technology. Demo rides amounted to swapping bikes with a newfound friend. I seem to remember a bonfire, and somebody playing a guitar—a far cry from The Earthtones jamming for a circus tent full of free-beer-lubricated mountain bikers.

Read more and see photos from the original Dirt Fest.

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