Dirt Rag Magazine

Karl Rosengarth

Karl Rosengarth

Title

Quality Manager

Yeah, but what do you ACTUALLY do around here?

Analyze. Synthesize. Hypothesize. Experiment. Fail. Succeed. Learn. Grow. Ride. Repeat.

What do you think about when you're riding your bike?

Deep thoughts. Riding purges the trivial from my mind and is a form of meditation.

How would you rate your coffee consumption on a scale of 8-10?

Varies with my level of self-control. Most days I self-regulate to hypo-jittery levels, but every once in a while I cross the line and go hyper. At that point the best cure is a brisk ride, so it's not all bad.

Complete this sentence: "My other bike is …"

a canoe.

What are you eating, drinking, reading, or fearing these days?

Extra virgin olive oil (the good stuff) / green tea / Flipboard / spiders.

Elvis or the Beatles?

Elvis

Say something profound and meaningful in exactly seven words…

Get your priorities straight. Nothing else matters.

I like your answers. How can I get in touch with you?

Email me

First Impressions: Rocky Mountain Thunderbolt


rocky-mountain-thunderbolt-1 The Thunderbolt is an all-new model in Rocky Mountain’s 2014 lineup. With its 120mm of travel, this 27.5 dual-boinger is Rocky’s general-purpose “XC” platform. The Thunderbolt slots in between the company’s Element “XC race” and Instinct “trail” bikes. Mind you, the folks from BC have high expectations of what an XC bike should do. Product manager Ken Perras told me, “The bike is designed to put the fun back into XC riding. That means hitting the lines reserved for something with a bit more travel, linking up those roots into a double, and letting go of the brakes on that crazy chute.” Read the full story

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Blast from the Past: Mongoose Minigoose Memories


Vintage product review shot from Dirt Rag #39.

Vintage product review shot from Dirt Rag #39.

One of the star attractions at Dirt Rag’s Dirt Fest is the fleet of Franken-bikes built by long-time Dirt Rag contributor Lee Klevens. One such contraption is a “mini-tall-bike” that the mad doctor built by welding a high-rise extension onto a 12-inch wheeled Mongoose Minigoose. This particular bike has an interesting backstory that begins 20 years ago.

Read about it here.

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Blast From the Past: Reader Art in living color


KONICA MINOLTA DIGITAL CAMERA

Our previous “Blast” dipped into Dirt Rag’s black/white reader art archives and featured a selection of monochrome masterpieces. This edition is a horse of a different color. We’ve put together a slide show of reader art that’s subtitled: In Living Color. Thanks again to all of the talented readers who’ve sent us their artwork over the years. We appreciate your creations, and enjoy sharing them with the world.

See the gallery here.

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Dirt Rag Spring Break 2014: Wilderness Adventure at Eagle Landing


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By Karl Rosengarth and Eric McKeegan. Photos by Justin Steiner and Jon Pratt.

For all of Pittsburgh’s endearing qualities, its wet, pre-spring weather sucks. There are weeks on end when the trails are just too wet and muddy for responsible riding. The optimal solution is to load Dirt Rag’s “trusty” Ford E-Series van with test bikes and head south, where spring is already busting out all over (or is close enough to permit proper bike testing). This year’s spring trip wound its way south and east—to Wilderness Adventure at Eagle’s Landing, located in the mountains near Roanoke, Virginia.

WAEL Blog (18 of 31) WAEL Blog (2 of 31)

Read the full story

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Blast from the Past: Reader Art


Since the very beginning, Dirt Rag has offered artistic types a welcoming space to showcase their creative talents. In addition to professional artists, whose works have graced magazine covers and illustrated feature stories, a number of regular readers have scored 15 minutes of fame via art appearing within the pages of Dirt Rag.

Danny Altizer, Issue #113

For a number of years, we regularly ran a half-page collage aptly named: Reader Art. While I’m sure folks were stoked to see their works in print, running five or six pieces on a half-page layout didn’t always do justice to the art.

The Dirt Rag blog to the rescue! I’ve decided to devote a series of “Blast From The Past” posts to showcasing some of my favorite Reader Art pieces. To honor Dirt Rag’s monochrome roots, I’m starting with some classic black-and-white artwork from days gone by.

See some of our favorites here.

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#tbt: Show us your tattoo


Shawn Brooks

With acres upon acres of cool bikes and gadgets on display at the annual Interbike trade show, it’s tough to get noticed. Exhibitors battle to attract the roving hordes to their booths. Most employ tried and true tactics: booze, booth babes and boatloads of booty (as in pirates’ booty, a.k.a. swag).

Dirt Rag has always been know for rolling its own. In 1996 our booth buzz scheme was a “Show Us Your Tattoo” promotion. We invited ink-bearing attendees to stop by our booth and have their body art documented via color Polaroid snapshots, which we posted on the back wall of our booth.

Dirt Rag Issue #55 featured a full-page black-and-white collage of our favorite 20 tattoos from the show. While rummaging through the Dirt Rag “hardocpy” archives, I stumbled upon the original tattoo Polaroids.

Eureka! This gold mine needed to be shared—in living color.

So without further ado, I give your “Our Favorite Tattoos” from Interbike 1996.

Click here to see the gallery.

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First Impressions: Fuji SLM 29 1.1


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Let’s get this out of the way first: SLM stands for Super Light Mountain. They ain’t lyin’. The $5,799 SLM 1.1 is the flagship of the Fuji SLM fleet and its frame is made from C15, Fuji’s highest grade of carbon fiber. The end result is a 29er frame weighing less than 1,000 grams (nearly 300 grams lighter than the 2013 version). The size medium bike tipped Dirt Rag’s scale at 22.2 pounds (without pedals).

Read the full story.

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A brief history of the Dirt Rag Office Dogs


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Canine co-habitation has long been a part of the casual atmosphere that prevails at Dirt Rag headquarters. From rides to relaxation, they are a constant companion. Some are gone, some are still with us, but they all warm our heart – and our toes under our desk.

With the assistance of the respective poochies’ partners, I offer this tribute to the four-legged denizens of Dirt Rag, past and present.

Meet them here.

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Blast from the Past: The Original Dirt Fest


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The first edition of Dirt Rag’s Dirt Fest took place in 1991 at Camp Soles, a YMCA youth camp located in the Laurel Highlands, just east of Pittsburgh. For me, that era represents a magical time, marked by glorious tribal gatherings known as mountain bike festivals.

In fact, I’d learned about Dirt Fest from some friends that I met at the legendary Jim Thorpe Mountain Bike Weekend. I attended the first Dirt Fest as a “civilian.” A few months after the event, I became friends with the Dirt Rag crew by showing up at their weekly rides in Pittsburgh, and about a year later I landed my first job at the magazine.

Compared to Dirt Fest’s current incarnation, the original event was decidedly chill. There was no vendor expo bristling with the bleeding edge of bicycle technology. Demo rides amounted to swapping bikes with a newfound friend. I seem to remember a bonfire, and somebody playing a guitar—a far cry from The Earthtones jamming for a circus tent full of free-beer-lubricated mountain bikers.

Read more and see photos from the original Dirt Fest.

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Review: Pivot Mach 5.7 carbon


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One bike to do it all—that’s the idea behind Pivot’s Mach 5.7. While the definition of “all” depends to a large extent on the rider, with its 145mm of rear travel and 26-inch wheels, the versatile Mach 5.7 is exactly the style of bike that would top my shopping list.

Chris Cocalis of Pivot Cycles gave me his take on the intended applications for this steed: “The Mach 5.7 is not an XC race bike, and it’s not a freeride bike; it’s really designed for everything in between. We consider it a do-all mountain bike, and that is the reason it is our best seller.”

Read on to see how versatile it can be.

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