Dirt Rag Magazine

Justin Steiner

Justin Steiner

Title

General Manager

Yeah, but what do you ACTUALLY do around here?

[quizzical look]

What do you think about when you're riding your bike?

[awkward silence]

How would you rate your coffee consumption on a scale of 8-10?

What's up with a scale from 8 to 10? Who does that? Nine: couple of cups in the morning, but rarely any caffeine after noon.

Complete this sentence: "My other bike is …"

... a motorbike! Two wheels, one love. The only thing as fun as pedaling two wheels is twisting a throttle.

What are you eating, drinking, reading, or fearing these days?

I'm fearing the slow, global radioactive poisoning of the globe post Fukushima. We're all screwed. This is a game changer and we're choosing to not to address the issue.

Elvis or the Beatles?

Elvis

Say something profound and meaningful in exactly seven words…

Pedal as though your life depends on it.

I like your answers. How can I get in touch with you?

412.767.9910 x106

Email me

Review: Marin Rocky Ridge 7.6


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I’ve always held an affinity for full suspension trail bikes because they facilitate a great deal of the flow I thrive on when trail riding. But since I spent many days riding and racing a fully rigid fixed gear on these same trails when I was young and foolish, I can certainly appreciate the connectedness, immediacy and feeling of precision a rigid ride offers.

The folks at Marin obviously appreciate a good hardtail, too, as it has shown with the Rocky Ridge series. Two 27.5-inch wheeled models with 130mm-travel forks are offered, both with the same frame and 1×10 drivetrains (chainguides included). The Rocky Ridge 7.6, tested, retails for $2,600, while the Rocky Ridge 7.4 retails for $1,950.

Read our full review of the rowdy Rocky Ridge 7.6.

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Review: Shimano Zee group


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Shimano’s redesigned Saint group has garnered much attention this year from those looking for the crème de la crème of Shimano’s gravity line. Fortunately for budget-minded shredders, Shimano trickled many of Saint’s technologies down to a new, mid-priced rival called Zee.

As with many of Shimano’s budget-friendly component offerings, Zee utilizes similar high-end technologies and designs, but keeps the price down by employing more affordable raw materials and construction methods. Relative to Shimano’s XC and trail group lineup, Zee fits in at about SLX-level in terms of fit and finish.

Read about each of the Zee components here.

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Trail Shooter Part 2: How to make better photographs


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Recently we introduced you to the basics of how the basics of photography work. In the second half our our Trail Shooter guide to mountain bike photography, we look at the art beyond the skills.

So how do you go about creating more engaging photos? There are hundreds, possibly thousands, of different answers to that question. I’ll toss out a few that I think are important. This info is my synthesis of many thoughts and theories that have been passed down by generations of photographers.

Read Part 2 here.

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Trail Shooter: The Dirt Rag guide to mountain bike photography – Part 1, the basics


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Those of us dirt bags reading this magazine have a common interest, for better or worse: riding mountain bikes. Additionally, most of us like looking at engaging photographs, as well as documenting our own adventures. It’s high time we write about making better photographs of our adventures, so you can share them with your friends, or even better, in the pages of Dirt Rag in our Rider’s Eye section. Note for photo nerds: I’m breaking some very complex ideas and concepts down into easily digestible chunks for people who aren’t photo geeks.

Ready to take better photos? Click here.

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First Impression: Marin Rocky Ridge 7.6


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Marin designed the 27.5-inch wheeled Rocky Ridge series for aggressive trail riders that prefer hardtails. There are certainly are lots of folks out there who prefer hardtails over full suspension for a multitude of reasons: lower initial purchase price, better parts spec at a similar price point, mechanical simplicity, or just riding style.

This is a lot of bike for $2,600. The stout aluminum frame offers all the latest standards we’ve come to expect, including a tapered headtube, ISCG mounts, internal dropper post routing and a 142×12 thru-axle. Interesting spec choices include a SRAM 1×10 drivetrain with X7 shifter and X9 Type 2, clutch-style rear derailleur. Crankset and chainguide are supplied by e*thirteen. Braking duties are assigned to SRAM’s four-piston Elixir 7 Trail units with tool-free reach adjustment. The inexpensive-but-excellent RockShox Revelation provides 130mm of travel up front. KS provides a Supernatural 125mm-travel dropper post with one of the more ergonomic remotes I’ve used.

Read more about the Rocky Ridge here.

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Review: Shimano Saint M820 group


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This Saint group is the third generation of Shimano’s high-end gravity offering. Where the previous two iterations erred on the heavier-duty freeride side of gravity riding, the new group has been nipped and tucked for a new focus on DH racing.

We previously review Shimano’s Zee group in issue #169. Since Zee features a lot of trickle down technology from Saint, we can’t help but compare and contrast the Saint vs. Zee value proposition.

Click here to read our full review of the new Saint group…

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