Dirt Rag Magazine

Access Action: Tahoe trailbuilders create magic with US Forest Service

Tahoe

Recently the Tahoe Area Mountain Biking Association (TAMBA) finished construction for the year on the Lower Corral Trail Enhancement Project and held a big grand reopening party and volunteer workday. The project in South Lake Tahoe, California includes purpose built features for mountain bikes including high wall berms, rock jumps, tabletop jumps and log rides. TAMBA partnered with the U.S. Forest Service to create one of the first trails of this type in the country in a National Forest.

For more info on how the project has been coming together check out the video put together by First Track Productions.

Corral Trail is one of the most accessible and popular mountain bike trails in Tahoe for locals and visitors. The trail is suitable for everyone from beginners to expert riders. The trailhead also serves as a hub of the mountain bike community, close to the largest population center in Tahoe. Improvements to Corral trail made by the USFS in the past eight years have been primarily focused on increasing the sustainability of the trail. Now TAMBA will introduce new mountain bike specific elements on the trail that will further elevate the trail’s status.

Lower Corral Trail will be reworked into a model trail with purpose built features for mountain bikes including high wall berms, rock jumps, tabletops and log rides. All features are designed to be enjoyable and challenging for all abilities, with the intent of developing user skill and progression.

Once complete, Corral Trail will be a model project for purpose built mountain bike features on a legal trail in a National Forest. Corral Trail will remain open to all current users including motorcycles, mountain bikers and hikers.

The SBTS professional trail crew will be working side-by-side with TAMBA’s trail crews and Forest Service staff to finish the new trail. It is open to trail users during construction, although it is advised that people consider an alternate route such as Incense Cedar Trail to avoid delaying construction activities.

 

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